Colour : Pink

Brighter pinks are youthful, fun, and exciting, while vibrant pinks have the same high energy as red; they are sensual and passionate without being too aggressive. Toning down the passion of red with the purity of white results in the softer pinks that are associated with romance and the blush of a young woman’s cheeks. It’s not surprising that when giving or receiving flowers, pink blossoms are a favorite.

Pink is the color of happiness and is sometimes seen as lighthearted. For women who are often overworked and overburdened, an attraction to pink may speak of a desire for the more carefree days of childhood.

  • Bright pinks, like the color red, stimulate energy and can increase the blood pressure, respiration, heartbeat, and pulse rate.
  • They also encourage action and confidence.
  • Pink has been used in prison holding cells to effectively reduce erratic behavior.
  • The pink ribbon is an internationally recognized symbol of hope and awareness in the fight against breast cancer.
  • In Japan, the color pink has a masculine association. The annual spring blooming of the pink-blossomed cherry trees (the Sakura) is said to represent the young Japanese warriors who fell in battle in the prime of life (the Samurai).
  • The Chinese had not recognized the color pink until they had contact with Western culture and the Chinese word for pink translates as “foreign color.”
  • In 1947, fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli introduced the color “hot pink” to western fashion. She dubbed the shade “Shocking Pink,” though today the color is more well-known as “magenta.”
  • Pink encourages friendliness while discouraging aggression and ill-will.
  • Since the color pink is said to have a tranquilizing effect, sport’s teams sometimes use pink to paint the locker room used by opposing teams.
  • Some studies of the color pink suggest that male weightlifters seem to lose strength in pink rooms, while women weightlifters tend to become stronger around the color.